Author Topic: Bryceson Bros.' magnum opus  (Read 4337 times)

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flared_ophicleide

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Bryceson Bros.' magnum opus
« on: July 26, 2014, 03:46:10 AM »
This forum seems to most nearly be appropriate for the following:

Nathaniel J. Holmes, of Primrose Hill, London, had the Brycesons build a 4-manual, 65-stop for his home in the 1870s.  Enlarged in 1936, it was re-located to St. Peter's RC, Buckie, Scotland.
NPOR says that St. Peter's shut and was converted into flats, but says nothing about the organ.

Does anybody have any idea what happened to it?

Barrie Davis

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Re: Bryceson Bros.' magnum opus
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2014, 09:55:18 AM »
Hi, I think you have the wrong church, West Church was divided into flats but St Peters remains. The organ was put here by Rushworth and Dreaper from Fort Augustus in a very reduced form.

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Barrie

David Drinkell

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Re: Bryceson Bros.' magnum opus
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2014, 03:12:57 PM »
My impression was that the organ was reduced in size at the last rebuild at Fort Augustus and installed at Buckie in much the same form.

There seems to be some doubt as to whether the original had four or five manuals.  From surviving reports, it seems to me likely that it had four manuals, with the Echo and Solo sharing at the top.

Barrie Davis

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Re: Bryceson Bros.' magnum opus
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2014, 09:33:18 AM »
Dear David,
You are quite correct, the organ was reduced in size to 3 manuals and 37 stops in 1979 by Rushworth and Dreaper, there is no further information about this rebuild. When moved to Buckie the number of stops increased to 39. I have my doubts about 5 manuals and feel that the Echo/Solo were floating divisions.

What is a Trigon Flute, I've never come across one!!!!!

Best wishes

Barrie

David Drinkell

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Re: Bryceson Bros.' magnum opus
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2014, 01:33:27 PM »
I've never encountered one either.  A Trigon was a triangular harp or lyre in ancient Greek and Roman times, the name coming from the Greek trigonon, which is also the root of trigonometry (I remember doing the latter at school, but I can't remember what it was!).

My guess is that it is a flute with three sides, sometimes found under the name "Flute Triangulaire".  Some Arthur Harrison Wald Flutes were three-sided.

The Trigon Flute doesn't appear prior to the last Rushworth rebuild, so I presume it was either a renaming or recasting.

Barrie Davis

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Re: Bryceson Bros.' magnum opus
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2014, 01:42:27 PM »
It was on the Great of the organ at St Augustus there were 2 flutes Flauto Traverso and Trigon both at 8ft pitch. I wish there were some pictures of the old console somewhere.

David Drinkell

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Re: Bryceson Bros.' magnum opus
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2014, 04:38:24 AM »
So it was!  I had been thinking that it was a conceit of Rushworths', who had a taste for fancifully named flutes - Flute Bouchee Harmonique (Stowe School had one), Stowe Flute (Wilton Parish Church, apparently a copy of one at Stowe).

Barrie Davis

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Re: Bryceson Bros.' magnum opus
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2014, 09:23:56 AM »
I agree with you over Rushworths and Flute names, I have looked Trigon up on a dictionary of organ stops and no mention what so ever!!!!

 


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