Author Topic: I don't believe in God. I believe in God  (Read 3750 times)

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David Pinnegar

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I don't believe in God. I believe in God
« on: March 21, 2013, 11:58:15 AM »
Hi!

After much searching through these columns I think there might be an answer to all belief.

The Jehovah's witnesses delivered a booklet the other day illustrating a rather amazing insect. "Evolved or designed?" it asked.

This goes to the assumption at the root of the modern misunderstandings of religion.

The bible talks not about the designer but the Creator. The God that Creates is different to a Designer.

Hawking and the modern atheists make the mistake of looking for a designer - not a creator.

The God Creator may not be a designer!

In fact the Creator may not be a noun. The Creator is something that creates, part of a verb.

It is a process.

St John chapter 1. Logos . . . .

In the beginning was the  . . . . logos.

I have seen this translated in numerous ways.

 . . intelligence, reason, law, sound.

As a sound it is interesting. The breath of God. The breath that gives life, given by the creator God of Life.

yHwH is a sound that must not be pronounced. It is a breath through the mouth, in and out.

aIYa is the same - the LL of Mallorca being not pronounced.

So YHWH is ALLA too with a minor difference of the placement of the tongue whilst breathing.

Is death and destruction through war and argument the way to celebrate the understanding of the process of life? Of breathing?

Glory be to YHWH. ALLAH is great!

In the beginning was the law . . .

This is simple. Jesus tells us about it in the parable of the talents.

The law is simple. What is more useful by definition is more useful than what is less useful. What is less useful lasts less and becomes compost for the more useful to use.

At the level of fundamental particles, they either work together and make matter of which we know, or they don't. The particles that don't work together nor create matter of which we are aware are no part of our world.

We are made of matter that at every stage has chosen to be useful. But we forget that. Jesus was telling us that we have to be useful too in the grander scheme of creation.

Creation according to the law, the verb, of what works together with all other matter, all other creation.

Unfortunately Jesus was hijacked by a sect that mistook him for God. They forgot that he was the son of god, according to his definition in three of the gospels and in the Gospel of Thomas too, 99, "My mother and my brothers are those who hear my father's words and do them" - leading to the definition of the children of god, sons and daughters of God, as was Jesus Son of God. Our aim as Christians is to be and become more like Him, sons and daughters of God. But not to Be god. Jesus was not God. And priests drive people out of the churches and away from the glories of organ music because they are out of touch with Jesus' teachings.

Understanding creation in a process for which God is a good shorthand is perhaps something in which we can all share. It is a process which brings Jesus' teachings and many of the Old Testament stories to life. It makes sense of what Jesus was teaching. God is in the doing, not the being nor the saying. It is how it happens, not what. It is the why it happens, not the what. It is not an idol, lifeless. It moves, and has to move to have life. That is the secret of Bach!

So Love thy Creator (the process of Creation) with all thy heart and bring it into the human realm, said Jesus, by loving your . . . . (familiar words) . . . . and that is all there is too it, he said.

What room for argument is there? Or disbelief?

If you love the process of creation, and work for it, and work it, then you can like Jesus walk on the water of the Sea of Circumstances and calm the waves, and make that mountain of difficulty disappear. Just as Jesus said. We don't need to misinterpret Him as a magic man who can walk on water. He asks us to walk on that water too, circumstances that work as an invisible sea upon which we float as boats visibly there but invisibly carried in the process of creation. We don't need Jesus to invent matter to feed the five thousand - we just need the spirit of Jesus to get the crowd to bring out their sandwiches from under their cloaks. The biggest miracle is to get humanity to work together, to cooperate with each other, to work as part of the wider creation process and thereby to be sons and daughters of God.

This is a process that we see happening all around us. So we can believe in it and Jesus tells us how.

If there are interpretations that go against the process, then it's the interpretations which are wrong, not the teachings.

Best wishes

David P

revtonynewnham

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Re: I don't believe in God. I believe in God
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2013, 10:11:56 AM »
Hi

One comment David - the Bible says "In the beginning was the word" (Logos) - not the law - that came later.

Every Blessing

Tony

David Pinnegar

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Re: I don't believe in God. I believe in God
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2013, 08:20:51 PM »
Dear Tony

Greek friends tell me that Logos is rather more complicated than just "the word".

Babel, the curse of different languages and nuances, plays terrible games between us all.

My posting might seem rather harsh against much of the priesthood perhaps, for which I apologise, but currently I'm at the sharp end of seeing a parish for which there is great support and sympathy for the local church but from which people are being driven away. Not the least of these reasons is a rather two dimensional vision of Jesus as God rather than Son of God - and perhaps a willingness to take this in the spirit of the references in Matthew, Mark and Luke and Thomas verse 99.

The world needs an understanding of the commonality of the breath of God, God the God of Life, shared by all humanity alive beyond that which the fixed idolatrous worship of the cross allows.

Thomas Cahill, "The Gifts of the Jews" makes an interesting read.

Best wishes

David P


 


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