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AES meeting Imperial College, Loudspeaker measurements using Tetrahedral

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dragonser:
Hi, sorry for the short notice.
Just to let you know that there is a lecture entitled " Comparative results between loudspeaker measurements using a tetrahedral enclosure and other methods " by Geoff Hill
on Tuesday the 11th of March at Imperial College, Main meeting room ( room 130 ) Huxley building SW7 2RH.
6-30 pm start
Free entry.
more details at http://www.aes-uk.org/meetings/forthcoming-meetings/london/

regards Peter B
 

KB7DQH:
I guess I am now going to search up what is specifically meant by a "tetrahedral" enclosure... I am assuming one which all four of the panels are equilateral triangles sized to produce the equivalent volume of a comparable rectangular enclosure, with the speaker under test mounted in the center of one of the triangles?

I have mucked about with enclosures which have the speaker (or speakers) are mounted in one face of a rectangular panel, then two more similar rectangles joined to the speaker panel on the shorter of the rectangular panel sides with the opposite end of the panels joined to form a point, and triangular panels cut to form the remaining two sides and have found this arrangement to be favorable to a conventional rectangular enclosure  ;)

Eric
KB7DQH

David Pinnegar:
Hi!

Thanks so much for posting this news. I went last night and it was interesting - basically looking at the imperfections of speaker measurements in standard setups, none of which are standard, and finding a methodology and a means of producing consistent results. With factories making products for manufacturers all over the world, achieving uniform reliability is a problem and this is a solution.

More details are on www.hillacoustics.com

It was also interesting in demonstrating the problems that one has in positioning a microphone, with anything.

(Whilst the usual specification of speakers is at 1 metre, a mic placed at 316mm from the unit gives an output 10db higher and 10cm, 20dB higher.)

Best wishes

David P

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