Author Topic: Couplers on Pistons  (Read 11734 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Jonathan Lane

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 156
  • Karma: +34/-1
    • View Profile
Re: Couplers on Pistons
« Reply #20 on: July 16, 2011, 04:18:19 PM »
If you want ease of use however, the Compton luminous stop knobs are the easiest.  One action can select and cancel stops in a way it is impossible to do on pretty much any other stop system.

Jonathan

Barrie Davis

  • Global Moderator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 358
  • Karma: +37/-2
    • View Profile
Re: Couplers on Pistons
« Reply #21 on: July 16, 2011, 07:17:49 PM »
Ive never used this system Jonathan but assume they are a pain when bulbs fail as with some recent toasters.

Barrie

diapason

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 311
  • Karma: +43/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Couplers on Pistons
« Reply #22 on: July 16, 2011, 07:33:50 PM »
Roger Taylor, who looks after Downside Abbey organ which uses these illuminated 'drawstops' told me many years ago that he was having great difficulty in getting hold of the correct bulbs.  The Compton organ in All Saints Weston-super-Mare is similar.  I've not played it myself, but it sounds superb in the hands of the resident organist, Christopher Manners, former MD of Percy Daniel & Co.

Nigel

Jonathan Lane

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 156
  • Karma: +34/-1
    • View Profile
Re: Couplers on Pistons
« Reply #23 on: July 16, 2011, 09:02:39 PM »
Yes, I am sure, but I suspect someone could come up with a suitable substitute (incidentally I need to sort out a similar problem here with a Viscount, or install a pipe organ!)  The Compton I used to play regularly was Holy Trinity Hull, one of the finest organs in the country!

Jonathan

diapason

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 311
  • Karma: +43/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Couplers on Pistons
« Reply #24 on: July 16, 2011, 09:39:51 PM »
The local Viscount dealer, Geoff North of WM Organs in Highbridge, Somerset, might be able to help you out with bulbs.  I think this is a regular service job for him.  But better to install a pipe organ if you can! 

Compton built some very fine organs.  I particularly like one of his small jobs - the organ in west Bagborough near Taunton.  http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi?Fn=Rsearch&rec_index=N05510  The original part of the organ - now the Echo - is 1811 Lincoln.  Compton added a second manual in 1925, keeping the beautiful Georgian case intact (but making it deeper) and keeping tracker action.  the whole organ is enclosed and its a beauty.

Nigel

Jonathan Lane

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 156
  • Karma: +34/-1
    • View Profile
Re: Couplers on Pistons
« Reply #25 on: July 17, 2011, 12:06:21 AM »
The local Viscount dealer, Geoff North of WM Organs in Highbridge, Somerset, might be able to help you out with bulbs.  I think this is a regular service job for him.  But better to install a pipe organ if you can! 
Will follow this up!

Compton built some very fine organs.  I particularly like one of his small jobs - the organ in west Bagborough near Taunton.  http://www.npor.org.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch.cgi?Fn=Rsearch&rec_index=N05510  The original part of the organ - now the Echo - is 1811 Lincoln.  Compton added a second manual in 1925, keeping the beautiful Georgian case intact (but making it deeper) and keeping tracker action.  the whole organ is enclosed and its a beauty.

Nigel

The interesting and important factor at Hull is the substantial three manual Forster and Andrews was the basis for the work in the 1930's.  F&A had already enlarged the organ in 1908 to 55 stops, and Compton's 104 speaking stop organ utilises the F&A sound a great deal.

I miss playing it!

Jonathan

londonorganist

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 12
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Couplers on Pistons
« Reply #26 on: February 01, 2015, 01:32:10 PM »

If one were playing on another clavier than the G.O., then the H&H device of Pedal to Swell Pistons is most useful. This gives a separate Pedal combination to match whatever is drawn (or pressed) on the Swell Organ. Exeter Cathedral is again an example of this.


The H&H system of separate Pedal combinations is, as you say, extremely useful, as it allows you to build the pedal without upperwork, which often can dominate if the swell is closed!
It is worth mentioning though that HNB pioneered this stop, although their system used a more basic function, where it kept the pedal one divisional step behind the swell. (I. E. Swell 5 would draw Pedal 4, etc.)

I use it when accompanying psalms as I tend to use the swell alone quite alot.

« Last Edit: February 01, 2015, 01:34:50 PM by londonorganist »

pcnd5584

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 251
  • Karma: +23/-3
    • View Profile
Re: Couplers on Pistons
« Reply #27 on: February 01, 2015, 10:12:50 PM »

If one were playing on another clavier than the G.O., then the H&H device of Pedal to Swell Pistons is most useful. This gives a separate Pedal combination to match whatever is drawn (or pressed) on the Swell Organ. Exeter Cathedral is again an example of this.


The H&H system of separate Pedal combinations is, as you say, extremely useful, as it allows you to build the pedal without upperwork, which often can dominate if the swell is closed!
It is worth mentioning though that HNB pioneered this stop, although their system used a more basic function, where it kept the pedal one divisional step behind the swell. (I. E. Swell 5 would draw Pedal 4, etc.)

I use it when accompanying psalms as I tend to use the swell alone quite alot.

Interesting - I did not know of the HN&B system - despite playing a number of their instruments.  However, I should still prefer the H&H system, since it is rather more flexible. Pedal Seven as against Swell Eight on a large instrument would still be likely to over-balance the Swell  Organ.
Pierre Cochereau rocked, man

londonorganist

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 12
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Couplers on Pistons
« Reply #28 on: February 01, 2015, 11:25:05 PM »
Interesting - I did not know of the HN&B system - despite playing a number of their instruments.  However, I should still prefer the H&H system, since it is rather more flexible. Pedal Seven as against Swell Eight on a large instrument would still be likely to over-balance the Swell  Organ.

Oh I agree! That is often why I add the reeds by hand as such a problem arises if I use the pistons for full swell. It is simply like that (I assume) because of the age of the system, which was invented back in the electro-mechanical days before H&H introduced their system. Nowadays I prefer the H&H system, as you say, it is much more flexible.

 


Locations of visitors to this page

Organ Design


Latroba Holidays