Author Topic: Organs really can be life saving and make the difference  (Read 4788 times)

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David Pinnegar

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Organs really can be life saving and make the difference
« on: July 21, 2011, 02:21:18 PM »
Hi!

A good friend who is not a member of this forum tells me that many professionals in the organ world specifically are not joining and engaging here at Organ Matters because of the presence of Atheist's Corner here. It's sad, as they are fortunate enough to have found their paths in life, and possibly contact with the Organ in an earlier age led them to be where they are now.

The local paper today tells a different story for young people who have not yet found their paths - in a directionless and faithless world:

and more:


These people found themselves in the vacuum of darkness. Of unknowing . . . of ununderstanding . . .

No doubt all of us coming to read what I write here are fortunate enough to have come here because we have come from our interest through knowing the Organ. I have written elsewhere here perhaps only half tongue in cheek about the Organ being like God. It certainly expresses some similarities which perhaps resonate in more than words . . it introduces us to an instrument
  • capable of immense size and power,
  • of powers apparently beyond our control and
  • with the temptation of bringing them within our understanding - and here I'm thinking of a brilliant demonstration of that last weekend at the Albert Hall where David Goode led the organ in battle and harmony with over 1000 performers including an 800 strong choir and two orchestras and multiple brass bands in the Havergal Brian Gothick Symphony
  • expressing the wrath of the earth - nature - even the G-word
  • expressing the harmony of all - and the harmony promoted by the G-word
so to "religious" believers and non-believers alike, we have all been so very fortunate to have had the privilege to have contact with The King of Instruments. The instrument has introduced us to the wider dimensions of life, conscious and subconscious, and those of us who play learn to use the instrument to create harmony in sound, just as we try to create harmony in life.

I postulate that organists who say they are Atheists possibly recognise this deep understanding and may be rejecting the limited dimensionalities of the mere written word, which they see as dogma, and which is an obstacle to their alignment to the religion that overtly they serve. The heresies which I propose from time to time are intended to attempt to break down those obstacles . . . and a challenge to those who propose and promote dogma to explain it in a higher plane . . . and in this way to create the better harmony that the King of Instruments promotes . . . for none should be excluded from the knowledge of the deeper and the beyond . . .

I referred to us all as having come here through the privilege of the knowledge of the Organ - and in many the sense of privilege is concurrently synonymous with duty.

Having the privilege of the greater understanding of life that the organ brings gives to us the duty to help those less fortunate than ourselves in a generation of suicides and undiscovered paths and faith that life does really hold a path.

Children alienated
  • from the wisdom of their grandparents by distance,
  • separated from the wisom of their parents by divorce,
  • from the guidance of their single mothers by reason of work,
  • from the deeper knowledge of history beyond the second world war - from their greater past which always leads into a future, and many have no contact with history as a subject at all
  • from the Lord's Prayer which gives hope, certainly and peace by reason of the abolition of school assemblies and the nature of the lack and paucity of religious education in schools,
leaving only contact with television, videos, computer games, facebook, friends and otherwise, and then nothing. Nothing except the emptiness inside and then suicide.

Then the Mental Health Services or the Emercency Services have to pick up the mess and foot the bill - for which we pay, instead of building organs - whereas in fact as I wrote in the post "The Lord's Prayer is good for mental health" upon which I might have been misinterpreted as preaching rather than observing, the route to mental health can be free, or made significantly less expensive. The families of the victims of ununderstanding who we see as headlines have elements of their lives brought to a full stop.

It simply is not fair for the younger generation to be deprived of the benefits that a more than superficial view of life can bring.

Meanwhile we see "religious" people in excessively burdensome sects not confined to christianity giving up fulfillment of their earthly life for their afterlife - which might be as illusory as the dimension of time and which might therefore be concurrent with our conscious life in this life.

As King of Instruments and master of a music beyond language, the organ can give that glimpse to beyond, without which life is curtailed, and which that words alone cannot bring.

For this reason I believe this section of the forum is an important part of the Organ and worthy of enthusiasm as part of those enthusiasms.

If you share this understanding, I hope that your enthusiasm may shine through perhaps even here.

If I need to be forgiven for breaking what you might consider to be a taboo, then please just close your eyes to this section of the forum and perhaps the Organ might encourage you to share your enthusiam in the other parts? But if the latter, I ask that we might share together how best to carry enthusiasm for the organ through into the next generations who have been deprived their understanding of "path".

Even the music of the organ in terms of Fugue, much of Liszt, Reubke and elsewhere in the musical realm Mahler's 4th Symphony and Brian's Gothic Symphony expresses path, and by interwoven themes, connexions and paths resonate with thought paths and processes in the brain. The Raga of Indian Citar is similarly sacred as are the rhythms of Cuban drums each with specific connotations.

Finally, I had the privilege recently of working with a young person who did not commit suicide like the young man in the newspaper. As a result of assistance through the Lord's Prayer and in his recognition that the vacuum of his former godless, rebelliously atheist, life meant certain earthly death, and his coming to terms with the very deep nature of the forces which bind all of the universes in harmony beyond the concept of a big Daddy greatly bearded and sitting on a cloud, his recovery through the local Crisis and Early Intervention mental health teams has been reduced to two months from the six months to three years that they would normally have expected.

The Organ gives an excuse to come into those places from whence an inkling of the deeper and further can come.

Best wishes

David P
« Last Edit: July 21, 2011, 02:54:29 PM by David Pinnegar »
David Pinnegar, BSc ARCS

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Re: Organs really can be life saving and make the difference
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2011, 06:24:10 PM »
Dear David

Is it not acceptable that one may have found their path in life without believing in God? I sometimes find it strange that some Christians think that unless you have a belief in God you are somehow lost and have no purpose or meaning. On the contrary, some people have found peace with themselves, their surroundings and their fellow human beings.

This does not of course mean that they stop thinking about the possibilities of alternative concepts, after lives, parallel universes and the like, but it means they understand that after the passage of time (which in reality does exist, my body tells me that) they die and their body is reduced to the component parts of the earth from which it came.

My non-belief in God in no way reduces my love and passion for the pipe organ; in fact if the two were not so closely linked it would make things a lot easier. The classical organ has and is definitely still in the domain of the church and it is difficult to ignore the fact.


With regards to the unfortunate people that are shown in the newspaper clippings, I am sure there are many suicides of people who have strong faith as well as those who are lost and directionless as you call them. We all have different levels of inner strength, some are strong and positive, others are not so sure, some even tremble in fear of life itself and for life to be life we all probably experience different degrees of these feelings at different times, that’s what makes us human.

I also don’t doubt that you think that having a focus and belief in a higher being is a positive thing and can guide you through your life, but in my opinion this is not just the only way.

Having said these things I still do feel that the Atheists corner is an interesting part of this website. For the non-believer’s opinion to be cut off from the close marriage of organ and church would be a bad thing (Well in my mind anyway; wouldn’t it be boring if we all agreed!) 

Marc
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Re: Organs really can be life saving and make the difference
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2011, 06:52:43 PM »
Hi

God uses ordinary people to do His work!

And, for the Christian, the consideration isn't only this life - this is merely part 1.  That's not to deny the fact that some people can feel fulfilled without a Christian faith (or any other faith) - but this life isn't the be-all and end-all of human existence.

Every Blessing

Tony

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Re: Organs really can be life saving and make the difference
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2011, 07:12:06 PM »
I have seen God work through other people and directly time and time again.  Friends are excellent, and help time and again, but as Tony says, this life is only part 1, and for myself, I can't wait to see what part 2 is like!  Not that I'm in any hurry to leave part 1!!

Jonathan

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Re: Organs really can be life saving and make the difference
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2011, 07:35:21 PM »
I think the question here is

“ Is it worth arguing about faith or lack or faith?”

If I were a Christian, I would definitely hope this is just the beginning of a wonderful journey through one life into the next, and I would see the work of God put through the actions of my friends, however as I am an Atheist, I suppose rather boringly I see things a bit more down to earth!

Whilst I confess to like the “Atheists corner”, I do wonder why David included it in this forum?
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David Pinnegar

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Re: Organs really can be life saving and make the difference
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2011, 08:29:52 PM »
I also don’t doubt that you think that having a focus and belief in a higher being is a positive thing and can guide you through your life, but in my opinion this is not just the only way.

Dear Marc, BC and Tony

Thanks so much for coming with more thoughts on this, as I passionately believe the subject to be worthy of thought and I hope that others will come through with further thoughts.

Neils Bohr, the quantum physicist is quoted as saying, in a way that perhaps only quanum physics can,
Quote
a great truth is a statement whose opposite is also a great truth
and I hope that this is capable of inspiring a duality of opinions in all of us at the same time.

I am an atheist, in so far as I do not have a "focus and belief" in a "higher being" . . . but I believe that there is a way of viewing the universe in a way that is most beneficial to all of existence. It's possibly compatible with theism but it's also compatible with atheism.

Our problem is often that we find a word and we say that the word is fact. But in fact the word is only a description of fact to the best of our ability and requirement of detail. It is an abstraction from fact but not the fact itself.

So a child might look at a car and call it a car. But there are many varieties of car that we possibly would not use to travel on a journey any more. The child will also look at a plastic toy steering wheel and dashboard and say "car". To the child it's a car but we can see it only as the abstraction of car that won't actually take us anywhere.

This is why it was wholly taboo to write or utter the name of G** as it's in a name that arguments occur and the idea of G** is an abstraction that's incomplete. Like the child's steering wheel and dashboard, it might only be an abstraction used to describe something else.

That something else provides for all the 3 dimensional space in the universe, indeed all the 10 or 11 dimensional space in the universe. As no two things can occupy the same place at the same time, there is always space for something to move into that is compatible with where it shall be and go. The result is a mathematical solution, as is the use of a DNA computer where a complex problem is set up as a sequence in DNA and of all the possible solutions to the problem, only the one or more sequences that replicate successfully are the mathematical solutions to the equation. This mechanism in the realm of DNA has Darwinian evolution as a result. But it is subject to a whole host of sequential applications of the fundamental laws which apply to all matter and from which none can escape.

The fundamental laws, relating to weak and strong electromagnetic fields, the forces between Up Down and Strange quarks, the nature of laws that result in the stability of these types of particle rather than an amorphous mass of something else that makes up everything rather than any other types of particle (there being a limited number of fundamental particles and antiparticles), laws of motion, laws of conversion between mass and energy, entropy and gravitation result in a giant multidimensional matrix of relationships and circumstances.

This matrix of relationships and circumstances, of which BC's friends form an important part when their relationships impacted upon him in the right way in a particular circumstance, applies from the unimaginably small sub sub atomic microcosm to the infinite of the macrocosm.

Some people naturally know their area of the network of relationships and their circumstances and they know what to do when something happens and can guide you into the next available useful space in the matrix. Some people are natural at this whilst others can usefully find helpful an instruction book, a phrasebook or guide.

The people who are "knowing" have a clear view around them whilst the people who are "unknowing" can wander around bumping into things and their neighbours and their environment in the darkness knocking the things off the table and sending the chairs for six or walking into lamposts because they're too distracted with clever manmade material things to see them.

But the problem we have is that it's all intangible and beyond description so that the only descriptions we have are an abstraction of the idea. Our guidebooks are written in printed words which are only two dimensional on the page. In order to understand the multidimensional we have to train our brain to think in parallels or parallel dimensions and this is why Jesus used parables.

One problem that we have as never before is that people have only the printed words at their fingertips. The printed word is only available when the book is open and when the book is shut, even the words disappear. We are now a society that relies on writing as never before. Former illiterate ages carried ideas in pictures and in sounds, the sounds of speech handed down over generations.

I teach people how to read walls, and tease out their story - for the reason that Led Zepellin's security guards had burned the papers in the cellars as they were a fire risk . . . they burned them outside . . . and thus only leaving the walls to speak. The practice of reading walls had been passed down by an enlightened history teacher.

An example of how we are now geared solely into literacy was the other day when I had 37 prep-school pupils before me. I asked them about the yellow double arch that they saw on top of a pole outside an eating establishment in the high street. As a logo designed in 1962 it has proved very effective. The children knew what company it represented and named it. I told them to turn the logo sideways in their minds and they continued to want to associate it with an alphabetical letter such as a B or an E and making nonsense. The visual connotation of the double arch as half a hamburger was rather a surprise. The official story is that the double arch was architectural but in practice the longevity and success of the logo is the abstract representation of the product.

In India still one hears children being taught the sacred texts by heart, being handed down generation to generation via the aural, living, word.

Living word because the words of, for instance The Lord's Prayer, when learned and even if not used, are a part of the subsconscious upon which the brain works and processes even when we are not aware of it. How much more fortunate therefore are those who have learned it, yes, even as an atheist.

It's for this reason that I find difficult to grasp the current translation of the prayer preferring the word "which" in the first line rather than "who". The word "Father" is a description - indeed perhaps an adjective and perhaps it's a state of being. Indeed perhaps it's an image of ourselves in the state of being as in heaven. Many self improvement schemes and books which many people value and pay fortunes for instruct people to visualise themselves as they would like to be . . . and they are promised that if they visualise how they would like to be that they will grow and become that person.

The trouble is that the sort of instruction book that lays around buildings near to organs doesn't cost the reader anything and comes free . . . and that in this material world people only know the value of what they pay for . . .

Posts on Part 1 and Part 2 have been posted whilst writing this . . . as a physicist with concerns about the validity of time, I'm leaning towards the idea of Part 2 being concurrent with Part 1, not the same, but concurrent, and therefore with the concept of making the most of life whilst one's here . . .

If atheists like to say that I'm a theist and if believers complain that I'm an atheist, then it demonstrates how possibly one can be both at once as one cannot possibly be neither, nothing at all.

Best wishes

David P

David Pinnegar, BSc ARCS

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Another one today. Can our enthusiasm for organs make the difference?
« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2011, 01:33:40 PM »
Hi!

Very sadly another example stared at me out of the pages of the newspaper today:


Can a faith and certainty in life, can an enthusiasm beyond the home and the computer, can an engagement with something bigger than we can normally contemplate, such as the Organ and all it leads to divert the course of young people's lives to the good?

If I may ask, BC, in your mention of troubles above from which your friends saved you, had you experience of christian teachings or not? Of course you don't have to reply publicly if you don't want to  . . .

I postulate that the low level of teaching of parents of the Lord's Prayer and "Love thy neighbour as thyself" and the low level of interaction of young people with churches through parents, Scouts and Guides, schools, and the doing away with assemblies in which popular hymns are sung is leaving our new generation devoid of anchors, devoid of landmarks and feeling isolated in a jungle. In the case of the girl reported above, a jungle inhabited by bigger animals.

There are many who won't introduce children to church on account of giving them "choice" - it has been said before that ignorance is no choice.

Indeed the young person with whom I have been working for the past two months had made the choice to reject - and as such discovered that it led only to death. However, in that rejection (which many ascribe to "Reason") was an atheism which, in order to help him bring himself back to life, I had to demonstrate could be accommodated within the wider circumstances that the "Book of Life" describes in the teachings of Christ so that he could receive the benefit that those teachings bring.

Experiencing the power of the organ is something which Voix Cynique has voiced on the Documentary thread as being attractive to young people, as it was to me at the age of 5, and this at least gives contact with the deeper things associated with the instrument.

In the same thread Barniclecompton has referred to the joy that the cinema organ can bring in happiness, dancing and the like. However, I postulate too that classical music undominated by gratuitous domination of beat, can be helpful in settling the mind, in calming it into deep thought in phrases that echo the rhythm of brain-waves and it's for this reason that "music therapy" is an increasingly acknowledged technique.

For these reasons am I mistaken in saying that the organ, on account of where it generally is, and its music has a wider part to be playing in society than is currently perceived?

Best wishes

David P
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Re: Organs really can be life saving and make the difference
« Reply #7 on: July 24, 2011, 02:06:56 PM »
Whilst I confess to like the “Atheists corner”, I do wonder why David included it in this forum?


Hi!


I hope that this question may have been answered perhaps not only above but also by the change of wording of the description of this part of the forum.


Perhaps also, those members of the forum and the wider community who have difficulties such as that to which a member referred above having been in the circumstances which sparked this thread, postings like http://www.organmatters.com/index.php/topic,704.0.html may help to inspire a confidence in the course of life and a certainty that they are not alone, whether by the active help of "g**" or "g**" within friends as to which Tony wrote or even strangers with tourist information through life http://www.organmatters.com/index.php/topic,730.0.html and certainly both Albert Sweitzer "The struggle for the good organ is part of the struggle for truth." and the late Stephen Bicknell "The organ is a continual reminder to us that learning and 'wrought objects' are God-given mysteries and part of the human struggle for Heaven on Earth" harmonised with http://www.organmatters.com/index.php/topic,760.0.html


Best wishes


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Re: Organs really can be life saving and make the difference
« Reply #8 on: July 25, 2011, 09:23:03 AM »
And to the end of "saving lives and making a difference" The organist at Trinity Episcopal in New Orleans began an every-Tuesday evening concert...


http://www.nola.com/religion/index.ssf/2011/07/organ_and_labyrinth_at_trinity.html

Quote
The poster outside Trinity Episcopal Church on Tuesday evenings reads simply, “Free concert 6 p.m.” What happens inside won’t fit on a sign.

                   
Trinity Episcopal church is lighted mostly by candles set around the altar, as participants walk a labyrinth on a canvas in the front of the church. The exercise is part of the long-running Tuesday night Organ and Labyrinth event.

Some say it’s a pilgrimage. Others, a space to find inspiration. One attendee called it “spiritual, yet magical.”

At Organ and Labyrinth, those who step inside the peaceful sanctuary enjoy the rich sounds of the magnificent 5,000-pipe organ from the comfort of a church pew or while walking the labyrinth on the candlelit altar floor.

“No matter what I’m doing, no matter where I am on Tuesday evening, I have to stop and come here,” said Chris L. Price, a regular since the program began five years ago.

Albinas Prizgintas, the church organist and director of music ministries, coaxes a wide repertoire of tunes from the four manual organ console. Selections each week are as varied as “Amazing Grace,” “Fantasia in G Minor” by Bach, a Sousa march, or a piece from the rock group Queen.

Those who walk the single winding path of the canvas labyrinth often stop at the center to pray or meditate. They look up at a stained-glass window depicting the Passion of Christ.

“Sunday morning, we worship as a group,” said Robert Burrow. “This gives me a chance to take a solitary walk with God.”

Each hour-long program is unique, as Prizgintas improvises and moves through selections, some of which are impromptu. Prizgintas said he often discovers something new in a familiar piece as he immerses himself in the music.

Maria Elliott brought her mother, an organist for 50 years in her Iowa hometown, to the event when visiting New Orleans. Elliott said her mother was delighted.

“My mother started giggling. She said, ‘This is a world-class concert. What a treasure,’ ” Elliott said.

Prizgintas is the creator and director of the award-winning Trinity Artist Series featuring local and world-renowned artists each Sunday at 5 p.m. at the church, 1329 Jackson Ave. Trained at the Juilliard School of Music in New York City, with studies in Germany and France, Prizgintas has performed on national and international stages in various venues.


Memphis Slim, Billy Ocean and John Sinclair are among the jazz and blues artists with whom Prizgintas has performed. Prizgintas directed the annual Kingsley House Fall Fest in New Orleans for 10 years.

The labyrinth rolls up when finished and is a replica of the centuries-old stone labyrinth on the floor of the Chartres Cathedral in France.

“To me, the labyrinth represents the journey of life with all its twists and turns,” Elliott said. A jar is sometimes placed in the labyrinth’s center as a symbolic depository for burdens, Elliott said.

Prizgintas said the labyrinth had limited use before Hurricane Katrina. After the storm, it took on new significance. “Everything was so strange then,” Prizgintas said. “It was a way to cope.”

Price was drawn to the event as he rebuilt after the storm. He said the labyrinth reminds him of the rosary in that it provides a path “to meditate, pray and reflect on the goodness of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.” Followers of any religion can participate. Printed information available to attendees encourages clearing the mind of the details of life. The goal is “joining God, your Higher Power or the healing forces at work in the world.”

“It is a way to escape the everyday craziness after work on Tuesday, and leave everything behind,” said Adriane Puetter.

Prizgintas learned the organ at his mother’s feet as she served as church organist in New Jersey. The Lithuanian family came to the United States after World War II.

The Trinity tracker organ has more than twice the number of pipes of the average organ. The smallest pipe has the diameter of a lead pencil. The largest is 32 feet tall. Tracker action means the wind flow into pipes is controlled mechanically, rather than by electrical means.

Prizgintas often encounters old friends at the event, and people going through difficulties. He said he thinks continually of what the composers meant to communicate and what it means to the walkers.

“It’s made me a better player,” Prizgintas said. “It made me evaluate whom I’m playing for.”

Dan Brady, a new participant, said he intends to make the event part of his regular routine. “The music is so inspiring. The labyrinth is so introspective,” he said.

Donald Lamury grew up in New Orleans and recently attended Organ and Labyrinth while visiting from his home in Virginia. He said the labyrinth was relaxing and a reminder of God’s presence.

“It doesn’t matter where y’at or what church you go to, God’s always there,” Lamury said.

Is this a unique program?

Could more "places containing organs" be similarly employed?

Reading this I remember a "blog" by some atheist who criticized what was felt by this person to be a "large" amount of money spent by churches on their pipe organs-- restoring, expanding, or purchasing of new instruments... I even linked to it, as his list of news articles was likely the most comprehensive "in one place" point on the Web where one could  find  publicly available information  on this work:o ;D 8) ;)     Reading through this subject to and include this post one can conclude that if lives can be saved physically and spiritually then these organ projects are worth every penny spent if one looks at the "really big" picture ;)

Eric
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Re: Organs really can be life saving and make the difference
« Reply #9 on: July 25, 2011, 09:27:12 AM »
Hi

It certainly looks interesting. Pity we have neither space for a sensible labyrinth, nor an organ adequate for more than the most basic church repertoire (because that's all we normally need).

Certainly an idea though.

Every Blessing

Tony

David Pinnegar

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Re: Organs really can be life saving and make the difference
« Reply #10 on: July 25, 2011, 01:07:22 PM »
Dear Eric

Thank you so very much for posting the article above -
http://www.nola.com/religion/index.ssf/2011/07/organ_and_labyrinth_at_trinity.html
there's clearly someone else very much on the same wavelength and actually demonstrating it in practice.

I'm not at all sure that many people understand me or what I say or even what I do nor its source of inspiration. Meanwhile, managing this forum over the weekend with a Saturday night brawl between cinema and classical organ enthusiasts, as anyone will see from the timings of overnight posts, and then sorting out the posts into rational categories, was an interesting and time consuming task. And whilst performing that task on Sunday morning instead of being somewhere else, I hoped that the experience of this forum would help one young member in particular ** to slow down in his life and access the deeper levels that perhaps the classical organ can bring, as shown here by this article. Life does not always sing and dance, and sometimes one has to take a deeper journey in order to find breath. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GG9nXryWNfk

This morning's news brought the tragic death of Amy Winehouse resulting from use of Cocaine and Alcohol. If only she had had the revelation that the sort of life she was leading had one outcome in earthly death, perhaps she might have been saved.

The young atheist with whom I have been working in recent months discovered just that when socialising with a group of chaps who he didn't know in Art College halls of residence known for "rinsing it" and being offered something strange, probably horse dope Ketamine.

The use of such drugs can often be a self medication for something else wrong in life, and that can often be an emptiness and seeking the something that atheist philosophy makes taboo. It's often an uncertainty, and a lack of direction, a play in search of a plot and an absence of usefulness of life to which the only remedy is faith.

Whether by atheist evolution or divine creation, all life has to have its purposes in order to be successful. Both atheism and theism thereby have to be religions and those who are unfulfilled, and even drop out, are those who understand neither.

He ended up unconscious, waking up surrounded by a group of blokes not knowing what had happened to him, suffering memory loss, episodes of total confusion and being unable to see. The event was near enough to death for him to see the need for total change, rebuilding from scratch. Indeed for a week following, the brain was unable to process nor apply error checking functions that are second-nature to us all.

All that was there was a load of memories, all jumbled up as if in the pigeon loft of memories a rat had eaten rat holes in the timber divisions between the pigeon holes, falsely connecting one thought with another, smashing the eggs, driving the pigeons into the wrong holes and eating the squabs on the way. It left the brain vascillating in an indeterminate state, to the point that all that was apparent was that emerging from the subconscious. Total nervous breakdown. A Psychosis. It was as if the computer had not simply had a Standby or Hibernate command, nor even ReStart. It was a case of a hard reset. When watching a computer start up, one often used to see a series of lines of programmes being loaded, all in the right order. His brain had to do the same, with the right foundations in the right sequence.

An understanding of the order of the world, of the universe and how everything fits together, can provide a framework and an understanding of directions available which progress that universal harmony and everything fitting in - and even as an atheist that order is well described by Christ who provided so many metaphors for the world in his parables and other aspects. But starting to get the idea of these is not the only path to accelerated re-birth and freedom from the old habits and ways. Debts to "friends" for former services rendered and goods supplied, all great worries, can be dissolved by Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice in which the Creditor is owed his pound of flesh but cannot spill nor take a drop of blood to go with it. Certain pieces of orchestral music, and organ music too, harmonise with brain waves and settle the mind, themes intertwining in the natural process of ordered flow of thought.

On that subject for the past two days, the themes of a Couperin Tierce en Taille * http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYzisyoQksg, (Tierce in the body - Tierce being pure and sweet expressing purity and sweetness and peace) have existed inescapably in my mind. On another Tierce en Taille, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ha1P_cN8kDc Gilberto Guarino gives the commentary
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The "Tierce en Taille" (6čme couplet du Gloria) is extremely deep, conveying the feeling of greatness, as the same time as it builds up a really dramatic mood. The musical speech demands stamina and a very incisive control of emotions. Also, one feels the absolute need of a clearer degree of the inequality. This "Tierce en Taille" is a masterpiece created by an amazing melodist and a naturally refined musical genious. Actually, I would say we are facing one of one of the most beautiful compositions ever written for the organ..

It is perhaps these Tierce en Taille compositions (however, sweet sound arising from Meantone or Unequal Temperament is helpful) that people to whom this thread might have been a mystery might be the beginnings of discovery of the mind settling powers of the Organ and some of its compositions.

The Tierce en Taille tunes are tunes that flow, go on journeys, explore emotions, pain and love, and resolve. They are a study of life.

I hope that all who have breakdowns, have experienced the mind destruction of LSA LSD Cocaine Ketamine Cannabis and bodily destructive Nicotine and even, beyond the healthy use, alcohol, might come to read this and accompanying series of threads, and that perhaps organists and churches in England might light a candle in people's minds in the manner that Eric has pointed out in the link above.

Michel Chapuis playing the Cromorne en Taillle in the first YouTube video above is performing at St Maximin at the beginning of the Academie D'Orgye, of which there are details in the Courses section of this forum. The concert could even be worth finding time for a short visit to France. . .

Best wishes

David P



* http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C16HE2uw3_U trying out the unpointed rhythm of http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5GIPTPyGzI and with the correct pointed quavers but interesting tonally for usage of Quintadena as both 8ft and Nasard 12th, with 4ft and Tierce in addition http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HAql0dfZQHY - forgive the playing - a year on it's now better!


** Sadly the member referred to above has left the forum and deleted his posts. He had posted in this thread that he has been in a similar situation to those headlined in the newspapers and that his friends had rescued him, leading to the intervening comments above, now orphaned, that God can work through friends. We had difficulties with this member on this forum obsessively promoting the Wurlitzer as the only and exclusively worthwhile type of instrument  on account of its ability to cause thousands of people to sing and dance, with a total rejection of deeper forms of music. The posts were often at antisocial hours, indicating a particularly disordered life and lifestyle and his disappearance from friends within this forum is of concern. The indications provided from his comment, now missing above, are that he may be in a state of mind dangerous tohimself and we hope that friends who are in contact with him can guide him well and that he will return to this forum in due course
« Last Edit: July 25, 2011, 01:53:50 PM by David Pinnegar »
David Pinnegar, BSc ARCS

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Re: Organs really can be life saving and make the difference
« Reply #11 on: July 25, 2011, 06:02:53 PM »
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For these reasons am I mistaken in saying that the organ, on account of where it generally is, and its music has a wider part to be playing in society than is currently perceived?

This morning I was "rudely awakened" by the most wonderful outbreak of what should be a "late-summer thunderstorm.  It is becoming increasingly apparent that this activity will likely continue unabated, and I may continue making audio recordings as these are compared to other parts of the country, rare events!

Rereading this subject I come across what is quoted above, then thought--

Maybe that's why John Wanamaker bought that disused organ and installed it in his department store?

 And at that moment, after a couple hours' calm,  at that very moment of thought-- the lightning/thunder resumed in earnest... With my eyes focusing on the computer screen the thunder quite surprised me :o   and prompted this reply ;)

Eric
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