Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.

Messages - JBR

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 6
1
Miscellaneous & Suggestions / Re: Is this forum dead? Is the organ dead?
« on: December 13, 2017, 11:24:53 PM »
Perhaps we should have a show of hands by those who can still see this.  Admin might then wish to try to contact other regular posters.

2
Organs in danger / Re: St Paul's Church, St Albans
« on: November 04, 2017, 10:25:30 PM »
So another one bites the dust.  Sad... and shortsighted of someone.

3
I sincerely hope not.

I have a long-standing interest in the pipe organ and, although I am an atheist, I attend churches and cathedrals not only to enjoy organ recitals but also to appreciate the architecture and history of the places.  I should also mention that I am also impressed by the peaceful and welcoming atmosphere of most of these places.

I can't believe I'm the only non-Christian with such interests!

Hopefully, as the following of most religions seems to be waning, perhaps churches may yet survive with functions such as meeting places, musical venues and, yes, organ concerts.

4
Miscellaneous & Suggestions / Re: Sibelius users!
« on: September 21, 2017, 10:14:03 PM »
Can you overwrite letters on Sibelius, or perhaps move letters about to position them anywhere?
If that is the case you could, for example, place an 'O' somewhere and then superimpose a '/' on top of it.  Similarly, an 'A' with a (reduced size) 'o' placed above it.

5
Miscellaneous & Suggestions / Re: Sibelius users!
« on: September 17, 2017, 09:48:07 AM »
Yes, Tony.  I had forgotten about that, but I've now found it hidden away somewhere and added it to my toolbar.
It certainly works when posting on here.  Let's hope it also works in Sibelius.

6
Miscellaneous & Suggestions / Re: Sibelius users!
« on: September 16, 2017, 10:20:51 PM »
A question for Sibelius users: how does one get Norwegian letters (the "a" with a little circle over it and the "o" with an oblique stroke through it?

I've been trying to find how do it, but no luck so far!

The only suggestion I can offer is to use Word (Insert/Symbol), type the word including the å or ø (see how I did that!), copy it and then paste into Sibelius.
I'm not sure whether Sibelius will accept text created in Word, but perhaps it's worth a try.

7
The owner might have been wealthy and probably didn't need any more money, but why did the selfish bugger not offer it for sale on ebay, preferably at a knock down price?  I'm sure he'd have got rid of it more quickly and easily than chopping it up and burning it.

8
Organs in danger / Re: Slow death
« on: September 04, 2017, 10:28:32 PM »
Sadly, I can't make the conference.  However, you may have seen the link I posted a few days ago to the campaign to save the organ in St Paul's, St Albans.  As a result of this campaign, a few of us are looking at the feasibility of forming a group aimed at the preservation of organs in churches - campaigning for their retention and use - and also the he-homing of organs which are 'redundant'.

Many green shoots amongst the devastation wrought by the happy clappy brigade.

A laudable proposal.  Unfortunately, the number of active churches seems to be reducing as well.

I must confess to being an atheist and so I do not attend church services.  I am, however, very happy to attend organ recitals.  Perhaps we could follow the lead of the French a couple of centuries ago and convert redundant churches to 'temples of reason'?  I don't know where the money would come from, though.

Re, the happy clappy brigade, I live in hope that it is a passing trend, and that it passes quickly!

9
The point about the Ripieno is that it's a buildup of octaves and fifths. So 8ft and 4ft Principal, then Nazard, Fifteenth, Larigot, 1ft, fifth above that and the octave above that. Of course they break back to the lower octaves at the upper end of the keyboards.

But perhaps people are familiar with the mock 32ft effect by playing fifths on the pedalboard. A fifth produces a beat note an octave below the lower note of the fifth. So as one starts to add octaves and fifths their beats add notes below them, and if these beats are strong enough, they will add octaves lower still. It's for this reason that the Ripieno adds gravitas whilst apparently going higher.

Best wishes

David P

But wouldn't you expect the same with quint mixtures and cymbels?  Or is it more to do with the sound quality of Italian principal pipes?

10
Organ History / Re: The Arp Schnitger Organ at Cappel
« on: April 15, 2017, 10:32:09 PM »
Thanks Ian.  Interesting information.

11
Organ building and maintenance / Re: Organ Pipe Making observations
« on: March 20, 2017, 10:23:54 PM »
Firstly, your question on the Spitz Flute and Erzaeler.
The Spitz Flute is a medium sized, in bore and cut- up, a robustly - toned flute.  The word ' Spitz " implies that it has an open, invertly tapered body, and it has been traditionally used in the main 8 ft or 4ft flute chorus on the principal keyboard of the organ.  However, different organ builders might have their own interpretation on this.

Secondly, the Erzaeler, which is a little more difficult to explain.
In the USA, it generally denotes a mild - toned string stop, often paired with a Vox Celeste which gives an undulating effect when the two are used together.
       However, my own interpretation of the Erzaeler  (German : Narrator ) has always been a reed register

Thanks for your explanation.

I asked the question because, outwardly at least, the Spitz Flute and the Ezähler look very similar (in being tapered).  Consequently, I always thought that they must sound fairly similar too, although I realise that appearances can be deceptive and there are a number of alterations that can be made to change the sound of a pipe quite radically.

I can't say I have ever seen an Ezähler on a British organ, and had assumed that it was an entirely American thing which was just another name for a Spitz Flute or perhaps a Gemshorn.

If a mild string stop, then, could it be somewhat similar to a Spitzgamba which, I think, is more likely to be found in German speaking areas?

I confess that I was completely unaware that there were Ezählers in the form of reed stops.

12
Organ building and maintenance / Re: Organ Pipe Making observations
« on: March 17, 2017, 10:46:31 PM »
No, I had nothing like that.  I'm sure I would have remembered.

Actually, I think it is probably a very good idea in order to deter, or prevent the access of, trolls.  The questions you quoted are the sort of thing that most organists (or non-organist afficionados, such as myself) would be likely to know.

Not being completely serious, but it occurs to me that they could put much more severe questions to people applying to join a hypothetical advanced forum, such as "What is the difference between a Spitz Flute and an Erzähler?"

Not a question I should be able to answer, I must admit!

13
Organ building and maintenance / Re: Organ Pipe Making observations
« on: March 16, 2017, 10:12:04 PM »
I must say, your forum verification process with the questions about organ knowledge are a bit scary and daunting for a novice, and were it not for Google, I'd have never even been able to join here - Is that the intent?

Eh?

I don't remember any of that when I joined.

14
Organs Preserved / Re: Hooglandse Kerk Leiden - Willis organ
« on: March 14, 2017, 10:30:15 PM »
I welcome any news of English organs, or even organs in the English style, being 'adopted' by other European countries.

15
Organ Builders / Re: The Hinsz -Schnitger - Freytag family
« on: March 14, 2017, 10:28:31 PM »
Yet more fascinating information.  Thank you, Ian.

16
Organ Builders / Re: The Hinsz -Schnitger - Freytag family
« on: March 02, 2017, 10:20:54 PM »
 :)

17
Organ Builders / Re: Arp Schnitger
« on: February 26, 2017, 10:17:15 PM »
Yes, very informative.

But wasn't there a mention of Stumm?  Amorbach?  I can't say I've ever heard that instrument other than recordings.

18
Organ Builders / Re: Arp Schnitger
« on: February 24, 2017, 10:42:33 PM »
Many thanks.

19
Miscellaneous & Suggestions / Re: Is this forum dead? Is the organ dead?
« on: February 23, 2017, 11:11:41 PM »
I'd just like to thank those involved for enlightening me with regard to oboes!

I have to say that I visit this forum (and one other organ site) every day in the hope of encountering threads on the subject of organ structure, history and tonality.  Sadly, more than often discussions tend to be concerning the music of the organ and its composers and players, although I can perfectly well appreciate that.  This last couple of days, however, has been like a trip to heaven!  Thanks again.

Perhaps we might see more discussion of my favoured subjects.  Ian's suggestions about Stumm and Schnitger would be very welcome as far as I'm concerned, and why not more about other European instruments and builders?  :)

20
Miscellaneous & Suggestions / Re: Is this forum dead? Is the organ dead?
« on: February 22, 2017, 11:18:57 PM »
Yay!  It's come back to life!

Looking back,  this thread seems initially to be John asking about the differences between a Swell Oboe and an Orchestral Oboe:   The main differences (at least in our own 'Willis' terms) is construction - the standard Swell Oboe or 'Hautboy' construction is usually a very small-scaled, reverse-conical tube (resonator) topped by a larger, faster gradient, reverse-conical 'Bell'.   The bell is either fully open, fully capped (soldered) or with a full cap left un-soldered to act as a regulating flap.

The invention of the Orchestral Oboe is credited to our own George Willis (brother of FHW) and given the higher pressure usually needed to make these I suspect that that credit is correct - George began the Willis voicing system for reeds which we still follow and without which no reeds can accurately be said (though it doesn't prevent them being said) to be 'Willis-style'!   The construction is a slightly faster gradient - though still relatively small-scaled tube,  without any 'bell';  A Willis Orch Oboe would be fully capped (soldered),  with a 1/3-diameter width slot cut  1/3-diameter down from the cap,  the resulting flap would be scrolled to prevent its being moved inadvertently after voicing and regulating,  and there would be a hole pierced opposite the slot.   

The shallots are also different:  the Swell Oboe would have a Willis 'C' set shallot, either 'filled in' or 'unfilled' dependent on the pressure to be used and the eventual tone required whereas the Orch Oboe would have a special form of shallot - very narrow with an extremely slow taper, open face and with a reverse-beaked end.   This gives a particularly thin - almost string-like - sound and a thick tongue is used in the voicing to bring back, as required, some of the roundness of the true Oboe tone.

Regards,

DW

Thank you very much for that, David.

Re. the difference in sound, then, I assume that in simple terms the Solo Orchestral Oboe would have a 'thinner' sound than that of the Swell.  So would the Solo Oboe be any louder than the Swell Oboe (both boxes open, of course)?

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 6


Locations of visitors to this page

Organ Design


Latroba Holidays